People, People, People

I first met IE Business School Emerging Markets Prof. Eduardo Morcillo back in 2006 when I did one of his courses on China. He’s so tall that when I first met him I thought he was a basketball player, but when I heard him talk with such passion and focus about the changes that were already taking place in China, I realized that his was another kind of expertise.

In this video he takes us on a walk around Beijing while he talks about the key factors for success when doing business in China. Check out what he has to say on the subject of people…

Prof. Morcillo is specialized in cross-border mergers & acquisitions. He’s an experienced negotiator and CEO of Interchina. He has also served as Chairman of the EU-China Trade & Investment Group, Vice Chairman of the Spanish Chamber in China, and as adjunct professor in two business schools.

With China in Mind

As someone who is always on the go and ready to spread education around the world, Santiago Iniguez, Vice-Chairman of the FT|IE Corporate Alliance (the FT|IE CLA), says that in-company management education is, and will continue to be, the fastest growing sector in business education. Here he examines key global trends, such as ageing populations and the extension of the retirement age, and what the leading executive education drivers will be in the coming years. It goes without saying that he does all that with China in mind.
P.S. In December 2014 the Financial Times and IE Business School launched the FT|IE Corporate Learning Alliance (FT|IE CLA), a new joint venture providing premium custom learning for business leaders.

Beijing Opera

Although this video runs for just three minutes, it actually took six months to shoot from the moment Operations Management professor Cui Zhijian and I first talked about it. It wasn’t because I thought it was necessary for Prof. Cui Zhijian to go to Beijing to do it, or that we needed support of other actors or an orchestra…It was because I knew that he was going to need the right make-up artist. As you know, the masks they use in Chinese opera add a great deal of drama and meaning to the proceedings, but finding a make-up artist that could do the job properly was no easy task. He asked among his connections in the Chinese community in Madrid, and I did the same with my Chinese professor and friends, but to no avail.

It was only by chance that I met make-up artist Eli Serrano García, who appears briefly in the video. A colleague of hers came to IE to do the make-up for another video, and when asked if she would be able to do it she replied that she couldn’t but that she knew someone that might. Mission accomplished!!!

On another note, the images of Beijing you’ll see were shot when I went to Beijing this April with IE Dean, Santiago Iñiguez. Unfortunately there was no way Prof. Cui Zhijian could join us. You can’t have it all.

P.S. Prof. Cui Zhijian is a Beijinger who has also lived in Paris and Canada. Ich bin auch ein Beijinger!!! It’s a real pleasure to listen to him talk about operations and the Beijing Opera. By the way, the second opera he sings is Ba Wang Bie Ji, which was turned into the film “Farewell My Concubine”. The film won the Cannes Palme d´Or. Excellent!!!

Globe-trotting

When the idea of doing a video of Dean Iniguez occured to me I instantly thought of the book  When the Going Was Good by Evelyn Waugh because the guy, the Dean, is always going.

In particular, I thought of one of the essays in the book, “Globe-trotting”, which begins randomly in Aden, then runs through the Zanzibar coast and down into the Congo. This is what Dean Iniguez does. He is always on the go, ready to spread education around the world. In this video you’ ll have the opportunity to see him in China and also in Segovia flying in a balloon, which as he puts it,  is “a metaphysical experience”.