The 3H´s

IE Business School leadership professor Margarita Mayo shares insights on how to become an authentic leader.
Those about to step into the role of leader are often faced with a challenge. What kind of leader to be?
Of course it’s important to learn from others, but it’s also vital to develop your own unique style based on your strengths and weaknesses: your own authentic leadership style.
IE Business School leadership professor Margarita Mayo was recently included in the prestigious 2017 Thinkers50 Radar, which showcases truly independent-minded thinkers from around the world, all driven by curiosity and innovation.
In her forthcoming book, Professor Mayo explores the shifting nature of authenticity in leadership roles. In this video, she shares three key, research-based insights into how to become an authentic leader: heart, habit and habitat.
She suggests leaders begin their search for authenticity by looking inside themselves. Find your passion, so you can share it with your team and inspire them, winning their hearts over.
Then, build healthy leadership habits by seeking out honest and critical feedback to develop a routine that helps you to grow, adapt and progress.
As an authentic leader, it’s also essential to enrich your organization, your habitat, by building an space that keeps its focus on the accomplishments of your team and helps them shine.
Listen to what Professor Mayo has to say about how to become an authentic leader – in essence, she’s telling you to follow your heart.

The Global Nomad

IE Business School professor Mark Esposito is an expert in business and economics who is away travelling some 200 days of the year. He says, however, that the world is now a sole, converged platform. As a social media mogul and serial blogger he asks himself whether he could be a virtual economist? It’s well worth hearing what this consummate global nomad has to say!

Prof. Esposito has also authored and co-authored 8 books. His academic work is regularly featured in the Academy of Management Journal, as well as in The Economist and Harvard Business Review