People, People, People

I first met IE Business School Emerging Markets Prof. Eduardo Morcillo back in 2006 when I did one of his courses on China. He’s so tall that when I first met him I thought he was a basketball player, but when I heard him talk with such passion and focus about the changes that were already taking place in China, I realized that his was another kind of expertise.

In this video he takes us on a walk around Beijing while he talks about the key factors for success when doing business in China. Check out what he has to say on the subject of people…

Prof. Morcillo is specialized in cross-border mergers & acquisitions. He’s an experienced negotiator and CEO of Interchina. He has also served as Chairman of the EU-China Trade & Investment Group, Vice Chairman of the Spanish Chamber in China, and as adjunct professor in two business schools.

The Myth of the Idea

In this video IE Business School entrepreneurship Prof. Newton Campos throws out the provocative idea that entrepreneurial ideas are not necessarily always a good thing. It’s almost as if he’s issuing a warning about what can happen when you have an idea, namely that while it could be good for society at large, there’s also a possibility it might be bad!!!

Entrepreneurs and ideas go together. But, as is the case with ideas, not every entrepreneur is good for society. Hear out his examples, enjoy, but brace yourself for a challenge!!!

P.S. Prof. Newton Campos is the author of the book The myth of the idea. He holds a PhD in Business Administration from FGV-SP and an MBA from IE Business School and the IIM Indian Institute of Management. He is managing director of SoliPh Entrepreneurship and Educational Services and writes a blog on education and technology for the O Estado de S. Paulo newspaper. He also chairs the Education and Technology Committee of the Brazilian Association of Startups.

The Fens

The most amazing thing is that when you talk to IE Business Schoool Strategy & Human Resources Prof. Ken Dubin the first thing you notice is that he is supremely competent when talking about serious stuff. Then, as soon as the conversation turns to other matters, serious or not, you realize that he continues to be extremely competent as well as displaying an incredibly serious ironic sense of humour!!
He says that the projects that get him up in the morning are those promoting networks that are both curiously inventive and collectively reflective. And those projects can be anywhere.
In this video he talks about The Silicon Fen and asks himself the question of how could Cambridge, a sleepy, if brilliant college town, become a world center of applied scientific innovation? Talent attracts talent –he says.

With China in Mind

As someone who is always on the go and ready to spread education around the world, Santiago Iniguez, Vice-Chairman of the FT|IE Corporate Alliance (the FT|IE CLA), says that in-company management education is, and will continue to be, the fastest growing sector in business education. Here he examines key global trends, such as ageing populations and the extension of the retirement age, and what the leading executive education drivers will be in the coming years. It goes without saying that he does all that with China in mind.
P.S. In December 2014 the Financial Times and IE Business School launched the FT|IE Corporate Learning Alliance (FT|IE CLA), a new joint venture providing premium custom learning for business leaders.

The Circus

If you’re interested in all kinds of stuff and don’t know exactly what it is you want to focus on, take a look at how IE Business School Marketing Prof. Felix Muñoz handled the same situation. First, he talks here about being a kind of “professional tourist.” What does that mean exactly? Basically, instead of looking for the best positions in a company, it involves switching between companies, doing the same things, but learning from different sectors and cultures. He also makes some very interesting points about having clear boundaries. He says, for instance, that every time he joined a company he laid out the conditions, one of which was, believe it or not, that they couldn’t promote him, because if they did he would have to stop doing what he had taken so much trouble to find…
In the course of his “professional tourist life” Prof. Muñoz worked in a broad range of companies, including Cepsa, Coca Cola, and Telefónica, as a director of communication, then a marketing consultant… But what he really cares about is happily trying to make sense of this circus of a world that we live in – in keeping with his name, “Felix,” which means “happy”. Don’t miss his visit to the circus!!!

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