Digital Humanities

In this video Digital Humanities Prof. Susana Torres proposes a new approach to the humanities because, she says, today’s students are iconic – they learn from what they see.

This is just one of several reasons she believes that in this digital era the humanities matter more than ever.

Prof. Torres specializes in medieval Russian literature and culture, focusing particularly on the survival of oral tradition or lore and the endurance of cultural models, as well as on the theory of literary genres. She has conducted her research in Cambridge, Paris and Columbus (Ohio).

She has published extensively on medieval Slavic culture and literature. Part of her research undertaken in recent years is the subject of her latest book “A Quest for Glory: Heroism in Medieval Russia” (Slavica, Bloomington, Indiana) due out shortly. She is currently working on a new book.

A Poker Game

Here Norman Kurtis, professor of consumer insights & behavior at IE Business School, talks about poker and how players’ behavior is similar to that of consumers in general. He says, for instance, that the concept of aversion, which means that the amount of suffering most consumers experience when they lose $100, is greater than the amount of joy they experience when given $100, is also seen in poker. His main point though is that the biggest change in the market research industry in the past 50 years is not the advent of online research, but rather the increased access to more relevant information from different sources that tell a holistic story (traditional research data, transactional data, social media data, web data, etc.).

Prof. Kurtis is half American, half Spanish, and has over 20 years of experience helping brands ask the right questions from a strategy, marketing and consumer insights perspective. He has worked at American Express in New York, at Accenture as an associate partner, and he was the CEO for Spain of marketing & market research agencies like Kantar and Ipsos… He is currently the vice dean of behavior & human development at IE School of Human Sciences and Technology. He holds an undergraduate degree from the University of Notre Dame and an MBA from London Business School.

Don’t miss seeing him play poker. Who do you think won? Anyway, don’t believe everything you see…!

The Global Nomad

IE Business School professor Mark Esposito is an expert in business and economics who is away travelling some 200 days of the year. He says, however, that the world is now a sole, converged platform. As a social media mogul and serial blogger he asks himself whether he could be a virtual economist? It’s well worth hearing what this consummate global nomad has to say!

Prof. Esposito has also authored and co-authored 8 books. His academic work is regularly featured in the Academy of Management Journal, as well as in The Economist and Harvard Business Review

Complexity

Data is fast becoming an organization’s most critical asset says IE business School Business Intelligence expert Prof. Josep Curto. There is, however, one thing you have to remember about it. Big Data is a confusing term, given that we usually just think about it in terms of volume. What companies really need to worry about is complexity, and more precisely data complexity. And complexity is not only driven by volume, velocity or variety (the 3 V’s of the world of big data), but also by other aspects such as the related IT strategy, data-driven culture or governance (the way data is managed, protected or accessed).

Professor Curto continues to challenge our whole approach to data saying that in his humble opinion the starting point should not be data itself but rather a business need or opportunity, and we will also need to understand the role data will play in leveraging that specific need or opportunity…

Prof. Curto is author or co-author of many articles, academic notes and books related to his professional expertise. He also has his own company, Delfos Research.

Not Knowing

In this video Steven d’Souza, Professor of Leadership, Diversity and Social Capital at FT-IE Corporate Alliance (FT-IE CLA), throws out the thought-provoking idea that we place too much emphasis on what we know rather than on what we don’t know…And maybe that’s what brought about the current economic crisis. Prof. D’Souza says that we have to look at the unknown as if it were a source of all kinds of possibilities, because that’s precisely what it is.

Steven is the author of three international bestselling books on diversity and networking published by Prentice Hall. His first book, “Made in Britain,” featured role models from diverse communities in the UK and was available free for schools through sponsors. He presented it in person to HRH Prince Charles. His second book, “Brilliant Networking,” has been translated into several languages and was featured by The Independent in their “Success at Work” series. This video takes its title from his third book, “Not Knowing”, which he co- authored with Diana Renner. Steven D’Souza and Diana Renner scooped the top award with the book at the CMI Management Book of the Year Awards, and I can tell you it was well deserved. In fact, skip the video and read the book 😉