The Global Nomad

IE Business School professor Mark Esposito is an expert in business and economics who is away travelling some 200 days of the year. He says, however, that the world is now a sole, converged platform. As a social media mogul and serial blogger he asks himself whether he could be a virtual economist? It’s well worth hearing what this consummate global nomad has to say!

Prof. Esposito has also authored and co-authored 8 books. His academic work is regularly featured in the Academy of Management Journal, as well as in The Economist and Harvard Business Review

Complexity

Data is fast becoming an organization’s most critical asset says IE business School Business Intelligence expert Prof. Josep Curto. There is, however, one thing you have to remember about it. Big Data is a confusing term, given that we usually just think about it in terms of volume. What companies really need to worry about is complexity, and more precisely data complexity. And complexity is not only driven by volume, velocity or variety (the 3 V’s of the world of big data), but also by other aspects such as the related IT strategy, data-driven culture or governance (the way data is managed, protected or accessed).

Professor Curto continues to challenge our whole approach to data saying that in his humble opinion the starting point should not be data itself but rather a business need or opportunity, and we will also need to understand the role data will play in leveraging that specific need or opportunity…

Prof. Curto is author or co-author of many articles, academic notes and books related to his professional expertise. He also has his own company, Delfos Research.

Not Knowing

In this video Steven d’Souza, Professor of Leadership, Diversity and Social Capital at FT-IE Corporate Alliance (FT-IE CLA), throws out the thought-provoking idea that we place too much emphasis on what we know rather than on what we don’t know…And maybe that’s what brought about the current economic crisis. Prof. D’Souza says that we have to look at the unknown as if it were a source of all kinds of possibilities, because that’s precisely what it is.

Steven is the author of three international bestselling books on diversity and networking published by Prentice Hall. His first book, “Made in Britain,” featured role models from diverse communities in the UK and was available free for schools through sponsors. He presented it in person to HRH Prince Charles. His second book, “Brilliant Networking,” has been translated into several languages and was featured by The Independent in their “Success at Work” series. This video takes its title from his third book, “Not Knowing”, which he co- authored with Diana Renner. Steven D’Souza and Diana Renner scooped the top award with the book at the CMI Management Book of the Year Awards, and I can tell you it was well deserved. In fact, skip the video and read the book 😉

The Myth of the Idea

In this video IE Business School entrepreneurship Prof. Newton Campos throws out the provocative idea that entrepreneurial ideas are not necessarily always a good thing. It’s almost as if he’s issuing a warning about what can happen when you have an idea, namely that while it could be good for society at large, there’s also a possibility it might be bad!!!

Entrepreneurs and ideas go together. But, as is the case with ideas, not every entrepreneur is good for society. Hear out his examples, enjoy, but brace yourself for a challenge!!!

P.S. Prof. Newton Campos is the author of the book The myth of the idea. He holds a PhD in Business Administration from FGV-SP and an MBA from IE Business School and the IIM Indian Institute of Management. He is managing director of SoliPh Entrepreneurship and Educational Services and writes a blog on education and technology for the O Estado de S. Paulo newspaper. He also chairs the Education and Technology Committee of the Brazilian Association of Startups.

The Circus

If you’re interested in all kinds of stuff and don’t know exactly what it is you want to focus on, take a look at how IE Business School Marketing Prof. Felix Muñoz handled the same situation. First, he talks here about being a kind of “professional tourist.” What does that mean exactly? Basically, instead of looking for the best positions in a company, it involves switching between companies, doing the same things, but learning from different sectors and cultures. He also makes some very interesting points about having clear boundaries. He says, for instance, that every time he joined a company he laid out the conditions, one of which was, believe it or not, that they couldn’t promote him, because if they did he would have to stop doing what he had taken so much trouble to find…
In the course of his “professional tourist life” Prof. Muñoz worked in a broad range of companies, including Cepsa, Coca Cola, and Telefónica, as a director of communication, then a marketing consultant… But what he really cares about is happily trying to make sense of this circus of a world that we live in – in keeping with his name, “Felix,” which means “happy”. Don’t miss his visit to the circus!!!